Living Planet Report 2020

The Living Planet Index

The population sizes of mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles have seen an alarming average drop of 68% since 1970.

The Living Planet Index by region

Living Planet Report 2020 booklet
Frog
Why are we losing nature?

Why are we losing nature?

Human activity is harming the natural world and we are paying the price. To protect human health, we must protect nature.

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Freshwater

Freshwater

Freshwater species populations are declining disproportionately faster - by an average of 84%

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Insects, soil & plants

Insects, soil & plants

Rhinos, polar bears and tigers may be the focus of most headlines about species loss, but did you know that many insects, plants and microscopic life forms are also facing extinction?

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Food security

Food security

Beyond the species of plants, animals, and fungi that we eat there are other species like pollinators and microorganisms that are essentail to food production.

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Healthy people

Healthy people

Almost all aspects of human health depend on a thriving natural world. But if biodiversity loss continues at the current rate, the health and well-being of many will only get worse.

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The economy

The economy

Almost all of our economic activity relies on nature. If we don’t tackle the nature loss crisis, we risk huge disruption to the world’s economies and harm to the lives and livelihoods of many millions.

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Reversing nature loss

Reversing nature loss

Pioneering new modelling shows that without further efforts to counteract habitat loss and degradation, global biodiversity will continue to decline.

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Nature-based solutions

Nature-based solutions

Nature itself can provide many of the solutions we need - from mangroves that help prevent flooding of coastal communities to wetlands that improve water quality.

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Pumping water from a well

What can you do?

If we continue to destroy the natural world, we will see more outbreaks like COVID-19, and the next pandemic could be even more deadly and costly.

Take action now